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Open Day April 1 2017

Posted in Newlyn Archive Events

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The next Open Day 'On the Other Side' is on Saturday April 1 2017 at Trinity Centre, Chywoone Hill, Newlyn from 10.00-3.00. The topic 'On the Other Side' conjures a multitude of views of Old Newlyn.

Certainly, the marching policemen in the photo above, were on the other side when the fishermen of Newlyn, Mousehole, Porthleven and St Ives protested about East Coast men fishing on the Sabbath and flooding the Monday market with their fish. A heavy chain was fixed across Newlyn harbour entrance and the baulks were put down at Mousehole. At Newlyn, the men boarded the boats that had come in during the night and threw the fish overboard...

'We were pious and stern, as our forefathers were,

We honoured the Sabbath day,

But the Eastern men made harvest hen,

And landed the fish on our kay,

And what use to shut with a mackerel glut

When our boats put out to say?'

But 'The Other Side' conjures much more than the Newlyn Riots of 1896. In the exhibition, we have tried to find examples of 'the other side' from earliest times to more recent times. We deal with the Spanish Invasion, 1595; Mousehole people's rejection of Newlyn in the cholera epidemic of 1832; a Newlyn Sea Captain walking the plank in 1850; the Welcome Stranger, 1869; fishermen dabbling with contraband in 1883; the sad case of Rolf Jonssen during WW1; Penzance, on the other side of the Rugby field, 1927; the Newlyn Clearances, 1937; Hulks, refugees and evacuees in WW2; the Torrey Canyon disaster, 1967; and Haul for the Shore, 1980.

There will also be films to watch, files and folders to explore, experts to consult, and much else, so do join us.

Download the Poster pdfPoster_5.pdf21/03/2017, 11:45

 

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Open Day 30/9/2016-1/10/2016

Posted in Newlyn Archive Events

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The photo above shows the erection of a second shed at the Seaplane Base at Sandy Cove in 1917 by the local builder George Curnow.

The next two-day Open Day 'They came, They Stayed and They Left' is on Friday September 30 2016 from 2-7, and Saturday October 1 2016 from 10-3.00. It contains material from the archive about the people who came to the area for a time, often contributed a great deal, then left.

Amongst other topics, it showcases the marauding Spaniards who burnt Newlyn, Mousehole and Penzance, three of the vicars of St Peter's Church in the Coombe who made lasting contributions to the local area, the airbase that occupied Sandy Cove in WW1, artists who came to Newlyn and Lamorna but did not stay, the Belgian fishermen and other evacuees who took refuge at Newlyn in WW2, shops that have opened and closed, and trades like quarrying and boat-building that once flourished in the area.

The Mousehole Archive will present material about their one-time resident Dylan Thomas.

There will be a tribute to Adam Kerr, who was the Patron of the Lamorna Society until his recent death.

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On Friday evening starting at 7.30 in the Wheal Betsy Room at Trinity Centre, there is a talk by archivist Pam Lomax about Henry Scott Tuke who first came to Newlyn in 1879, visited for a number of years, then decided that his permanent home would be Falmouth. The talk covers the years he spent in Newlyn and explores the places where he stayed and the local people that he met. There will be a £3 entry fee at the door towards archive costs.

Do download the poster for the Open Day.

 pdfPoster_5.pdf18/09/2016, 10:20

 

 

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To-ing and Fro-ing, Saturday 16 July 2016

Posted in Newlyn Archive Events

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The photo of WJ Olds, Butcher in his horse-drawn cart outside the Kings Arms, Paul is just one of the many examples of T0-ING and FRO-ING in the exhibition at the next Newlyn Archive Open Day 'To-ing and Fro-ing: getting there and getting back' at Trinity Centre on Saturday July 16 2016, 10-3.00.

The Exhibition tells the story of transport through the ages as it affected the people who lived at Newlyn and round about Newlyn.

First and foremost, were the fishing boats like the lugger PE 233 Mystery that took seven men to Australia in 1854.

For speed and sea worthiness, Newlyn luggers could not be excelled. In 1885 a Newlyn lugger sailed from Scarborough in less than 72 hours. In 1890 three luggers sailed the 600 miles to Scarborough in 70 hours.

As the fishing industry prospered and the new piers were built there were 'Bird' boats with names like Auk, Albatross, Crane, Drake, Gannet, Guillemot, Mallard, Petrel, Philomel, Raven, and Stork that took pilchards from Newlyn to Genoa

From earliest times, fishing was the most important industry in Newlyn. Horse-drawn vehicles took fish from the fish auctions on the beach at Newlyn to Penzance station for dispatch to the London markets. Before the 1914 war most people at Newlyn relied on these carrier's carts or on horse drawn wagonettes. Blanche Brown, who was born in 1906 explained that if a woman could afford 2d for a ride to market in the wagonette she would do so, but halfway up Morrab Road she had to get out and walk the steepest part, as the wagonette was pulled by a single horse. Once the wagonette got to the flat, the passengers could get in again; and coming home, they could board the wagon at the top of Morrab Road and ride straight through to the bridge in Newlyn.

Newlyn did not have its first motor bus until December 1919, run by the Hitchens family at Tolcarne. The bus ran from the First and Last Hotel in Penzance through Newlyn and on to Mousehole. The vehicle, registered AF2381, was named Porth Enys, the old name for Mousehole. In 1922 there was competition from the Harvey family of Mousehole who set up their own bus company, and in 1926 the Western National Omnibus Company set up its headquarters at Wherry Town.

There was to-ing and fro-ing below ground as many Newlyn men worked in the mines when fishing was bad. The off-shore Wherry Mine had a long timber trestle over the sea for access. In other mines on the North Coast, miners who worked deep down could have travelled on the reciprocating man engine, which sometimes took as long as 50 minutes to get to the bottom of the shaft, with the men stepping on and off at regular intervals. Below ground there might have been a tramway with wagons to load the tin and sometimes there would be donkeys to pull the heavy wheeled containers.

Janner Maddern to-ed and fro-ed as he drove the engine named after him from Penlee Quarry to Newlyn's South Pier pulling wagons full of stone to load on to the 'Brook' stone boats, which had names like Caernarvonbrook, Chesterbrook, Clarebrook, Corkbrook, Cornishbrook, Dorsetbrook, Glenbrook, Somersetbrook, Stirlingbrook, Warwickbrook, Westminsterbrook, Winchesterbrook, and Worcesterbrook.

The Exhibition gives many other glimpses of 'to-ing and fro-ing' and there will be display books and film shows on the day so please 'To and Fro' to Trinity Centre on Saturday. You can downlaod the poster by clicking on the PDF file below.

pdfPoster.pdf08/07/2016, 09:20

 

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The Building of Newlyn Harbour, April 2016

Posted in Newlyn Archive Events

 

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Inspiration to develop Newlyn Harbour came from a number of people whose interests ranged between concern for the well-being of fishermen to commercial interest concerned with the landing and sale of fish. The vicars at St Peter's Church, best represented by the Rev Wladislaw Lach-Szyrma motivated by humanitarian concerns played a key role in the initial fight for the harbour while commercial interests perhaps represented best by the entrepreneur and land owner Thomas Bedford Bolitho continued the impetus. The photograph above shows a proud Thomas Bedford Bolitho in top hat surrounded by other dignitaries at the opening of the North pier on July 3rd 1894.

This Open Day covers the full development of Newlyn Harbour from the election of its first harbour commissioners in 1884 to the present time. It spans the building of the South and North Piers, the erection of two fish markets in 1908 and 1988 and the building of the Mary Williams Pier. It highlights the Newlyn Riots and their aftermath when for nine years from 1897-1906, the management of the harbour was taken over by the Public Works Loan Board. From 1906, when the harbour was returned to its elected commissioners and was becoming more prosperous, there were considerable developments in its infrastructure with a new trawl fish quay, a coastguard boathouse, new harbour offices, new market facilities and RR Bath's new ice house where Newlyn made its own ice for the first time. Alongside this, the fishing fleet was becoming larger with foreign boats using harbour facilities alongside the growing fleet of Newlyn boats, the most prominent of which, was the post WW2 Stevenson fleet.

Hopefully, the exhibition pinpoints some of the key figures along the way, including the harbour masters, William Oats Strick in 1886, to our present Rob Parsons. But we rely on our visitors to add to the growing dossier of information we have amassed about Newlyn Harbour. We would also like to thank the Newlyn Harbour Commissioners for their generous sponsorship of this Open Day.

The Open Day 'The Building of Newlyn Harbour' is at Trinity Centre, Chywoone Hill, Newlyn on Saturday April 9 2016, from 10am until 3pm

 Please download the poster

pdfPoster2.pdf01/04/2016, 08:14

 

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Archive Open Day February 2016

Posted in Newlyn Archive Events

418 Roger Clemence27 10 2004

The picture above shows high tide at Newlyn Harbour's North Pier, October 27 2004. Courtesy of Roger Clemence.

The first Newlyn Archive Open Day of 2016 on Saturday February 13, 2016 10-3.00 at Trinity Centre reminds us that there were many great storms in the past that certainly equalled the recent one of 2015. Here are two examples of many that we share at the Open Day.

The great storm of October 1880 flooded Newlyn and wrecked the fishing boats moored there, sending them to the bottom, stranding them on the shore, or wrecking them on the rocks. Even more tragically, it resulted in the loss of the Mousehole fishing boat PZ 26 Jane, a 2nd class lugger which went down just outside Penzance harbour. The crew of six men and a boy were drowned in full sight of their wives and children. The rocket apparatus was on the pier but the storm was too ferocious for it to be used. As with all disasters some good accrued later and the 1880 storm was a powerful argument in getting approval for the building of a South Pier at Newlyn; it was also key in leading to the construction of the new road on the Western Green, between Wherrytown and Newlyn.

There were many serious storms that followed. One storm was called the Blizzard in the West. Cornishman reporter Douglas Williams contributed the following account to the records of the storm that were collected and published a month after the blizzard.

'It was on Monday March 9, back in 1891 that the giant blizzard struck the county. The fine weather of the past weeks suddenly ended, the temperature dropped quickly, and snow began to fall as the wind increased in strength. There was tremendous damage to property in the next few days, trains were de-railed, many ships wrecked around the Cornish coast, and throughout the county there were stories of lives lost in snowdrifts...

On the railways in Cornwall and Devon some passengers were snowed up in a train for 36 hours... During this week the takings on the Great Western showed a drop of £12,980... A train that left Penzance at 6.25 pm that night arrived at Plymouth at 3 pm next day. There was a drift of snow 20 ft high at Grampound... When a gang of men arrived to clear the track the cold was so intense that the snow froze on the men's clothes, practically encasing them in ice...

Much of the damage on land could be repaired: at sea there was a different tale. During this week there were wrecks from Start Point to Falmouth resulting in the loss of over 50 lives. At Penare Point, near Helford River, the 2,282 tons Bay of Panama went aground. The captain, his wife, all but one of the six officers, four apprentices and six of the crew, were either frozen to death in the rigging or drowned... There was a serious collision, resulting in the loss of 22 lives, about 140 miles SW of the Isles of Scilly. Only two were saved of the crew of the Roxburgh Castle 'although their piteous cries for help were plainly heard on the British Peer.'

A hawker of wild flowers, Ambrose Matthews was found dead under three feet of snow at Newquay... One woman... found buried in the snow... had mistaken the gate of the field... for that of her own home, and entering the field had fallen exhausted... her basket with the provisions she had bought in the town was found lying beside her. Mining operations in the Camborne-Redruth area were interrupted. A boy named Wallace left his work at one local mine on the afternoon of the storm to walk to his home. Ten days afterwards his body was found in a snow-drift some 30-40 yards from his home.

The Archive Exhibition touches on most of the great storms that have hit Newlyn from the 1880 and 1891 storms to the Great Ash Wednesday Storm 1962, and other subsequent storms ending with the recent events of 2015.

Also contributing to the Exhibition will be the Mousehole Archive and the Lamorna Society Archive.

Let us hope all the storms on Saturday February 13, 2016 will be inside the main hall at Trinity Centre!

Do download the poster.

Click on the PDF file below and save it to your computer.

pdfPoster.pdf19/01/2016, 20:24